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History and Social Science Courses 202
History and Social Science Courses


Aurora High School History Dept. Course Descriptions.docx


Did you know that many of Canada’s Prime Ministers have degrees in history, politics, philosophy, and economics? These are all disciplines found in the History and Social Sciences Department. For example Prime Ministers Mackenzie King, Lester B. Pearson, Pierre Trudeau, Brian Mulroney, Paul Martin, and Stephen Harper studied history, politics or economics. You might also be surprised to learn that prominent American presidents Woodrow Wilson, Teddy and Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Richard Nixon were history majors. In addition, Chris Berman (ESPN Sportscaster), Wolf Blitzer (CNN anchor), Seymour Hersh (investigative journalist), and Charles Kuralt (news correspondent) majored in history. So did comedians Sascha Baron Cohen, Conan O'Brien, Michael Palin (of Monty Python fame), and comedienne Janeane Garofolo.


Grade 10

Academic Canadian History since World War I
CHC2D1
This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: Academic
GRADE: 10
 
 
FI Academic Canadian History since World War I
 
 
CHC2DF
This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: Academic
GRADE: 10
PREREQUISITE: FIF1DF - French Immersion
 
Applied Canadian History since World War I
CHC2P1
This course focuses on the social context of historical developments and events and how they have affected the lives of people in Canada since 1914. Students will explore interactions between various communities in Canada as well as contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian heritage and identity. Students will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating the continuing relevance of historical developments and how they have helped shape communities in present-day Canada.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: Applied
GRADE: 10
 
 
Civics
 
 
CHV2O1
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
CREDIT: 0.5
TYPE: Open
GRADE: 10
 
 
Civics (French Immersion)
 
 
CHV2OF
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program.
CREDIT: 0.5
TYPE: Open
GRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take GLC2OF - Career Studies (French Immersion)
 

Grade 11

American History                                                                     CHA3U1
 
Grade 11 American History provides students with the analytical skills and knowledge to think critically about America and the world. The course provides an overview of America's early Native Americans, early colonial settlement, the American Revolution, American government, America’s African ancestry, the institution of slavery, and the lead up to the American Civil War. Important developments that have contributed to America’s status as a global superpower will be examined such as World Wars One and Two, America’s nuclear supremacy, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, Black Civil Rights, and Women’s Rights. Important individuals such as George Washington, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, Pocahontas, Thomas Jefferson, Henry Ford and Rosa Parks are featured. Class lessons will include debates, internet assignments, role plays, lectures, dramatic performances, posters, pamphlets, readings, regular homework, videos, essays and power point presentations. This course provides essential understandings for anyone who one day desires to work in the United States, attend an American college or university, work with an American company or some day conduct business in the United States. A class field trip to Washington D.C. will be offered.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University
     GRADE: 11
PREREQUISITE: CHC2D1 - Academic Canadian History since World War I or CHC2DF - FI Academic Canadian History since World War I or CHC2P1 - Applied Canadian History since World War I
 
 
World History to the Sixteenth Century
 CHW3M1
World History to the end of the Fifteenth Century covers human history from 2 million years ago to 500 years ago. The course begins with the evolution of early humans, looking at such questions as why our Neanderthal neighbours became extinct and why marriage began. Students also see how modern humans travelled across the planet during the Ice Age and why people from different continents look so different from each other. Then the class learns how humans domesticated plants and animals after the last Ice Age and began the first civilizations. After a look at ancient Mesopotamia, the first civilization on Earth, students study all aspects of ancient Egypt, from the pyramids and hieroglyphics to the suicide of Cleopatra, and do an Egyptian funeral with an embalming, a burial in a tomb, and a funeral feast. After learning about the ancient Jews and why there was so much friction between them and other cultures, the course covers ancient Greece, with such subjects as Greek mythology and art, the Trojan War, the Spartans and the repulse of the Persian invasion, and Alexander the Great. This is followed by the Romans with the Roman army, Julius Caesar, gladiators, and the fall of the empire to the barbarians. Students do group presentations on Japan, China, India, Islam, and Africa, and the Aztecs, Mayas and Incas (other civilizations such as Korea are possibilities), and as a class examine the middle ages with the Vikings, knights, castles, the Crusades, and the Black Death. The course ends with the Renaissance and its art. There are various feature films and good quality documentaries and a field trip as well.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University/College
GRADE: 11
PREREQUISITE: CHC2D1 - Academic Canadian History since World War I or CHC2DF - FI Academic Canadian History since World War I or CHC2P1 - Applied Canadian History since World War I

 

Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology
 HSP3U1
This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University
GRADE: 11
PREREQUISITE: ENG3U1 - English (University) or CHC2D1 - Academic Canadian History since World War I or CHC2DF - FI Academic Canadian History since World War I
 
 
Philosophy: The Big Questions
 
 
HZB3M1
This course encourages exploration of philosophy’s big questions, such as: What is a meaningful life? What separates right from wrong? What constitutes knowledge? What makes something beautiful? What is a just society? Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they identify and analyse the responses of philosophers to the big questions and formulate their own response to them. Students will explore the relevance of philosophical questions to society and to their everyday life. They will develop research and inquiry skills as they investigate various topics in philosophy.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University/College
GRADE: 11
PREREQUISITE: Any college, university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
 

Grade 12


World History: The West and the World
 
CHY4U1
This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political, and economic systems. Major topics covered include the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European exploration of the America’s – i.e. Columbus, the Enlightenment, French Revolution, Russian Revolution, Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Bismarck and Realpolitik, World War One, Russian Revolution, Stalinist Russia, World War Two and Hitler’s Germany. Near the end of the course important current European issues will be examined. Students will be challenged to use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyze historical documents. Students will be taught the skills to research and write a major term essay. As a result, students will find themselves imminently well prepared to write an analytical essay for college and university. Class lessons will include a wide variety of activities such as debates, class trials, internet assignments, role plays, lectures, dramatic performances, posters and pamphlets, readings, regular homework, videos, essays, seminars, and power point presentations.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University
GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
 
 
Analysing Current Economic Issues
 
 CIA4U1
One word: scarcity! Economic fundamentals underscore decisions individuals and nations make on a daily basis. This course investigates the nature of the competitive global economy and explores how individuals and societies can gain the information they need to make appropriate economic decisions. Students will learn about the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, apply economic models and concepts to interpret economic information, assess the validity of statistics, and investigate marketplace dynamics. Strongly suggested for students considering any post-secondary business program.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University
GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
 
 
Challenge and Change in Society
 
  HSB4U1
This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.
CREDIT: 1
TYPE: University
GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.



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