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Courses

 

Canada Since World War One CHC2D1
Many Canadians view the 20th Century of Canada’s history as boring. Furthermore, as a subject, History is considered to be purely memorizing dates and studying irrelevant events. Yet, you will find that this course will shatter those assumptions and convince you that Canada’s history is one of dramatic and interesting events. Travel back in time to experience a WWI boot camp firsthand, learn the music and dances of the 1920s, see if you can make money in a 1930s stock market game, and hear about the horrors of the Holocaust by meeting a Holocaust survivor. Discover that the study of History can be fun and worthwhile as you learn about recent events in the 20th and 21st Centuries through simulations, film, and interactive activities. In addition, this course will assist you in developing skills for the OSSLT (Literacy Test) as it provides a foundation for the development of many important skills such as research, essay writing, and analytical thinking.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Academic GRADE: 10
L'histoire canadienne depuis la Première Guerre mondiale CHC2DF
Many Canadians view the 20th Century of Canada’s history as boring. Furthermore, as a subject, History is considered to be purely memorizing dates and studying irrelevant events. Yet, you will find that this course will shatter those assumptions and convince you that Canada’s history is one of dramatic and interesting events. Travel back in time to experience a WWI boot camp firsthand, learn the music and dances of the 1920s, see if you can make money in a 1930s stock market game, and hear about the horrors of the Holocaust by meeting a Holocaust survivor. Discover that the study of History can be fun and worthwhile as you learn about recent events in the 20th and 21st Centuries through simulations, film, and interactive activities. In addition, this course will assist you in developing skills for the OSSLT (Literacy Test) as it provides a foundation for the development of many important skills such as research, essay writing, and analytical thinking.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Academic GRADE: 10
Canada Since World War One - for ESL/ELL students CHC2DL
This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Academic GRADE: 10
Canadian History since World War 1 CHC2L1
This course focuses on the connections between the student and key people, events, and themes in Canadian history from World War I to the present. Students prepare for the Grades 11 and 12 Workplace Preparation history courses through the development and extension of historical literacy and inquiry skills. Students explore a variety of topics highlighting individuals and events that have contributed to the story of Canada. The major themes of Canadian identity, internal and external relationships, and changes since 1914, are explored through guided investigation. Students have the opportunity to extend analytical skills with a focus on identifying and interpreting events and perspectives and making connections. Students practice reading, writing, visual, and oral literacy skills, and mathematical literacy skills to identify and communicate ideas in a variety of forms.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Locally Developed GRADE: 10
Canada Since World War One CHC2P1
This course focuses on the social context of historical developments and events and how they have affected the lives of people in Canada since 1914. Students will explore interactions between various communities in Canada as well as contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian heritage and identity. Students will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating the continuing relevance of historical developments and how they have helped shape communities in present-day Canada.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Applied GRADE: 10
L’histoire canadienne depuis la Première Guerre mondiale CHC2PF CHC2PF
Travel back in time to experience the challenges of a WWI trench, learn the music and dances of the 1920s, see if you can make money in a 1930s stock market game, and hear about the horrors of the Holocaust by meeting a Holocaust survivor. Discover that the study of History can be fun and worthwhile as you learn about recent events in the 20th and 21st centuries through simulations, film, and interactive activities. The major themes of Canadian identity, internal and external relationships, and changes since 1914, are explored through guided investigation. In addition, this course will assist you in developing important literacy skills and strategies for building on French language vocabulary as well as preparing to write the OSSLT (Literacy Test). In addition to historical concepts, this course will allow students to formulate questions, locate information, develop and defend informed opinions, and make connections between historical and current events. Students will practice reading, writing, visual and oral literacy skills and will communicate ideas in a variety of forms.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Applied GRADE: 10
Civics CHV2O1
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
CREDIT: 0.5 TYPE: Open GRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take GLC2O1 - Career Studies
Citoyenneté CHV2OF
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program
CREDIT: 0.5 TYPE: Open GRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take GLC2OF - Explorations des choix de carriére
Civics - for ESL/ELL students CHV2OL
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
CREDIT: 0.5 TYPE: Open GRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take GLC2OL - Career Studies for ESL/ELL students
American History CHA3U1
Are all “men” really “created equal” and do all Americans really have the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”? This course will examine the historical factors that encouraged Christopher Columbus, the Puritans, and other former and contemporary immigrants to head West and try and get their piece of apple pie and live the American dream. Through an examination of important legal documents like the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution and the Bill of Rights, this course will also assess the contributions and writings of many important political figures like Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr. For the longest time, the United States has dominated world politics. This course will explain how a relatively newcomer to the game and Canada’s closest neighbor has managed to influence social culture, economic and world politics.
COURSE NOTE: Pre-requisite: Grade 10 History, Academic or Applied
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 11
World History Since 1900: Global and Regional Perspectives: Behind the Blockbusters CHT3O1
Have you ever found yourself questioning the validity of the movie you just paid to see? Have you ever asked yourself, which parts of the movie actually happened and which parts are merely figments of the director's overactive imagination? Was there really a central love story ingrained in every single historical event that Hollywood has chosen to portray? Find out the answers to these and many burning questions in this course that examines 20th Century history through the Hollywood lens of movie making. In it, we will be challenging the validity of Hollywood's interpretation of world history from 1900 to the present. We will learn how to ask key questions and apply these critical thinking skills in engaging and interactive projects. Find out which parts of history were accurately depicted and which parts have been altered to misguide the general public into believing it to be true.
COURSE NOTE: Prerequisite: Grade 10 History since World War 1, Academic or Applied
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Open GRADE: 11
World History to the end of the Fifteenth Century (formerly World History to the Sixteenth Century) CHW3M1
This course will explore the exciting events and issues of the ancient world. Travel back through time to ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, and many other historic cultures. Students will not only learn about these important civilizations, but experience them first hand through dramatic simulations such as working on an archaeological dig, building your empire in the computer game Civilizations IV, constructing Egyptian tombs, participating in the Olympic Games, and analyzing the accuracy of such films as Troy and Gladiator. In a final culminating activity, students will plan and present a time travel tour to other ancient cultures such as India, Japan, Isreael, African Kingdoms, Incas, Mayans, Aztecs, and the Islamic Middle East.
COURSE NOTE: Prerequisite: Grade 10 History since World War 1, Academic or Applied
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University/College GRADE: 11
Understanding Canadian Law CLU3M1
This course explores Canadian law in four areas: the history of our laws; human rights legislation; the criminal justice system; and civil law (including torts, marriage, contracts). Students will have the opportunity to take part in a mock trial, as lawyers or witnesses, and to visit the provincial and federal courtrooms at the Ontario Superior Court in downtown Toronto. Other activities include a research essay on a controversial legal issue (capital punishment, euthanasia, computer piracy…), debates, real case examples, and guest speakers (Civil Liberties Association, Street Beat Police Officers).
COURSE NOTE: Prerequisite: Grade 10 History since World War 1, Academic or Applied
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University/College GRADE: 11
Comprendre le droit canadien CLU3MF
This course explores Canadian law in four areas: the historical roots of our legal system; human rights legislation; criminal law and procedures; and civil law (including contract, family and tort law). Students will have the opportunity to visit the Ontario Superior Court in downtown Toronto and participate in discussions with a francophone judge and crown attorney, take part in a mock trial, and prepare their own crime video. Other activities include debates about controversial legal issue, discussion of real cases and current legal issues, and visits by guest speakers from the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the York Region Police, and lawyers specializing in civil litigation.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University/College GRADE: 11
Philosophy: The Big Questions HZB3M1
This course encourages exploration of philosophy’s big questions, such as: What is a meaningful life? What separates right from wrong? What constitutes knowledge? What makes something beautiful? What is a just society? Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they identify and analyse the responses of philosophers to the big questions and formulate their own response to them. Students will explore the relevance of philosophical questions to society and to their everyday life. They will develop research and inquiry skills as they investigate various topics in philosophy.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University/College GRADE: 11
Adventures in World History CHM4E1
This course explores a variety of human experiences in world history from earliest times to the present. Students will learn about a wide range of societies and cultures, examining such things as systems of government, technological developments, work, art, and religion. Students will apply methods of research and inquiry to examine human societies in many different times and places and to communicate points of view about their findings.
COURSE NOTE: Prerequisite: Grade 10 Canadian History since World War I, Academic or Applied (With the approval of the Ministry, a locally developed Grade 10 course in Canadian History may also serve as the prerequisite.)
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: Workplace GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: CHC2D1 - Canada Since World War One or CHC2DF - L'histoire canadienne depuis la Première Guerre mondiale orCHC2DL - Canada Since World War One - for ESL/ELL students or CHC2P1 - Canada Since World War One or CHC2PF - L’histoire canadienne depuis la Première Guerre mondiale CHC2PF or CHC2PV - Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10 Applied, Language LD
World History since the end of the Fifteenth Century:From History to Hollywood CHY4C1
Events in History continue to be popular plots for Hollywood movies. Yet, how accurate are these “Historical Films”? How do such films influence our views of History and the modern world? The answers to these questions will be addressed throughout this exciting course. Students will examine the fact and fiction behind films which depict dramatic events in European History and their impact on the rest of the world from the Renaissance to the Modern day. Through an extensive use of film, students will research, analyze, and make critical judgments about the impact of various revolutions that have changed the world. Using the lens of film and History, students will develop critical skills needed for future studies in College or the world of work.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: College GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any college, university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
World History since the end of the Fifteenth Century (formerly West and the World) CHY4U1
This course investigates the dramatic events in European History and their impact on the rest of the world from the Renaissance to the Modern day. Who was Henry VIII and what happened in the Tower of London? Decipher the art of Leonardo da Vinci to decide whether or not his art reflects a secret code and study the major revolutions and wars of the twentieth century. One of the highlights of the course is a unit long simulation on the French Revolution. In this activity, students will experience the revolution firsthand by dramatic role-playing, mock trials, and event re-enactments to see who in the class can rule France! In addition, students will learn to critically evaluate various forms of information ranging from primary documents to historical films. Students will also research and write an essay that presents an argument on a historical event, individual, or issue of personal interest and relevance to the modern world. In this way, the course prepares students for University courses in the Arts, Humanities, and the Social Sciences.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Canadian and International Law CLN4U1
This course examines Canadian and international law with a strong focus on relevant issues. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law, human rights, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, criminal law through the progression of your own case, and principles and practices of international law. Activities include writing closing statements as a lawyer representing a client, analyzing controversial cases, designing your own prison, and participating in a simulation in which you decide the fate of the world. Students will research and write an essay that analyses any legal issue in the world, and participate in a variety of presentations (including guest speakers) and debates.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Le Droit canadien et international CLN4UF
This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world . Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal issues, conduct independent research, and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of ways .
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities.
COURSE NOTE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
Canadian and World Politics CPW4U1
The purpose of this course is to help students develop the critical thinking skills with which to refine their understanding of Canadian and world politics. Students will be introduced to the intellectual tools, such as the characteristics of different ideologies, in order to make sense of the complex nature of political studies. As this is an introductory course, a broad range of historical and contemporary topics will be explored, including the influences on international relations, the management of conflict and the promotion of international order. Students will build their own nations, attend "spy school" and participate in a model United Nations project!
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
Challenge and Change in Society HSB4U1
This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
Philosophy: Questions and Theories HZT4U1
This course is designed towards providing students with the necessary critical thinking skills to face the self defining question: “Am I a product of my environment, or is my environment a product of me?” Students will examine the works and ideas of important philosophers from around the world, while engaging in discussion and activities surrounding topics such as: the nature and structure of power and control, choice vs. obligation, freedom and terror, social vs. personal identity, the realm of infinite possibilities, anxiety, good and evil, ethics, and the good life. This course will also focus on 21st century philosophy in the media arts through such films as Inception, Memento, and The Matrix. Assessment pieces will focus on the ability of students to apply their knowledge in a creative and relevant manner, as is evident through the following assignments: solving a murder mystery, developing a philosophical brand and motto, creating a guidebook on how to live one’s life according to perspective of a particular branch of philosophy, producing a video about moral dilemmas, designing false premise posters, constructing a test that can determine if someone is good or evil, and surviving the in class Lord of War role playing game.
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
La Philosophie: Approches et problématiques HZT4UF
While students examine the work and ideas of important philosophers from around the world, they also learn the basic foundations of logic and argumentation through engaging activities like role-playing a detective and solving a murder mystery. They will refine their ability to defend a position in a debate on ethical practices concerning topics like our responsibility towards the environment, war, gene modification, and corporate accountability. Students are also encouraged to develop and support their own philosophical ideas with regards to contemporary controversial socio-political situations and personal moral dilemmas. Oral presentation and thinking skills, as well as literacy and research techniques are further developed through the organization of class seminars and small group discussions. So, not only are students analyzing classical primary texts and modern-day cinematographic productions like Inception or The Matrix on the nature of reality, but they are also exploring questions surrounding the meaning of life.
COURSE NOTE: Course offered in French for students in the French Immersion Program
CREDIT: 1 TYPE: University GRADE: 12
PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.

 
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